2007: Yale University, Institute of Sacred Music

FMCS at Yale University, Institute of Sacred Music, 9-10 March 2007

See below for:
  1. Program
  2. Registration
  3. Location
  4. Hotel Reservations
  5. Travel Directions to Yale Institute of Sacred Music

PROGRAM

Friday, March 9

8:30 – 9:00 Continental Breakfast
9:00 – 9:15 Welcome and Introductions (Markus Rathey, ISM)
9:15 – 10:30 Concepts of Art and Religion I: Historical Perspectives
Robin A. Leaver (Westminster Choir College): Concio et Cantio: The Counterpoint of Theology and Music in Lutheran Perceptions from Praetorius to Bach
Elizabeth Kramer (University of West Georgia): A Religion of Art? Music and the Divine in Early Nineteenth-Century Kunstreligion
10:30 – 10:45 Break
10:45 – 12:30 Paradigm France: Society and Religious Discourse
Lisa Hooper (Indiana University): The Religious Discourse of the Cantate Spirituelle in Versailles Education, 1708-1721
Kristy Riggs (Columbia University): Exoticism Redefined in Berlioz‘s L‘Enfance du Christ
Catrina Flint de Médicis (McGill University): Joseph Pothier‘s Frozen Lips: Musical Ventriloquy and Nineteenth-Century Sacred Music Reform in France
12:30 – 2:00 Lunch Break
2:00 – 3:15 Concurrent Sessions
a) Analysis and Musical Meaning
Edward Green (Manhattan School of Music): Mozart‘s Requiem, the Saturation of Chromatic Space, and the Theology of Death as Continuation
Christopher White (University of Kentucky): Analysis of Scriabin’s Pseudo-Christian Forms: The Prolongation of Scriabin’s “Mystic Chord” in the “White Mass” and “Black Mass” Sonatas
b) Religion and Nation I
Bogumila Mika (University of Silesia): Bogurodzica – Song to the Virgin
Connie Lau (Stanford University): The Political and Religious Contexts of Luigi Cherubini‘s Requiem in C minor
3:15 – 3:30 Break
3:30 – 4:45 Concurrent Sessions
a) Popular Music and the Sacred
Kevin Holm-Hudson (University of Kentucky): Matisyahu: Proclaiming and Reclaiming the Psalms with Beats
David H. Perkins (Vanderbilt University): Hell Yeah!: Pairing Southern Religion and Punk Aesthetics in the Construction of American Gothic Music
b) Religion and Nation II
Eftychia Papanikolaou (Miami University): Religion and Nationalism in Franz Liszt‘s Hungarian Coronation Mass
Daniel Grimminger (independent scholar): Faithful to the End: Pennsylvania Tune Books and German Ethnic Identity in Kirche and Singschule
4:45 – 5:00 Break
5:00 – 6:30 Keynote: Thomas H. Troeger, Lantz Professor of Christian Communication (Yale Divinity School and Yale Institute of Sacred Music)
6:30 – 7:30 Reception

Saturday, March 10

8:30 – 9:00 Continental Breakfast
9:00 – 10:45 Concurrent Sessions
a) Johann Sebastian Bach
Stephen A. Crist (Emory University): Theology and Musical Conventions in the Arias of J. S. Bach
Mark Peters (Trinity Christian College): A Woman‘s Voice in Sacred Baroque Music: Mariane von Ziegler as Cantata Librettist
John Sall & Edward Latham (Temple University): Key Relationship and Musical Meaning in Bach‘s St John Passion
b) Olivier Messiaen
Christopher Dingle (Birmingham Conservatoire): Symbols, Tam Tams and Wisdom: The Influence of Vatican II and Transcendence in Messiaen‘s La Transfiguration de Notre-Seigneur, Jésus-Christ
Vincent Benitez (Pennsylvania State University): The Influence of Saint Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Theologiae on the Compositional Aesthetic of Olivier Messiaen
Andrew Shenton (Boston University): Messiaen The Theologian: Exegesis and Enterprise in La Nativité du Seigneur
10:45 – 11:00 Break
11:00 – 1:00 Concepts of Art and Religion II: Contemporary Perspectives
Peter Mercer-Taylor (University of Minnesota): Hymnody and the Problem of Musical Signification
Michelle Stearns (University of St. Andrews): Theology and Musical Space: Arnold Schoenberg, Jeremy Begbie and the Conception of Unity.
Richard Wattenbarger (La Salle University): Musicology for the Church

Registration

Registration before January 31, 2007: $ 40.00 (Students: $ 20.00)
Late registration: $ 50.00 (after January 31, 2007) (Students: $ 30.00)
Please fill out the registration form and return it together with the check (payable to Yale Institute of Sacred Music) to:

Yale Institute of Sacred Music
FMCS Meeting 2007
409 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511

Location

Sessions will be held in the Great Hall of the Institute of Sacred Music (409 Prospect Street). Specific information on the location of paper sessions will be made available to registrants prior to the conference. Conference information packets, including the conference program and a map of the Yale campus, will be provided at check in.

Hotel Reservations

Guest rooms have been arranged at the New Haven Hotel (229 George Street, New Haven, CT) in downtown New Haven (http://www.newhavenhotel.com, tel: 1-800-NH-Hotel). The nightly room rate at the New Haven Hotel is $105 per room (single or double), plus tax. The rate is a special Yale rate, please indicate your participation in the conference upon reservation.

If you wish to investigate other hotel options please reference the following link for a guide to local inns and hotels:http://www.yale.edu/gateways/visitors.html

Travel Directions to Yale Institute of Sacred Music

By Air

Tweed–New Haven Airport is served by US Airways. Local taxi service, Metro Cab (203.777.7777), is available at the airport. Connecticut Limousine Service (800.472.5466) to New Haven is available from Bradley, Kennedy, LaGuardia, and Newark airports.

 

By Car

Interstate 95 (from east or west)

At New Haven take I-91 North to left-hand Exit 6, Willow Street. At the end of the exit ramp, turn right on Willow Street and follow to the end. Turn right on Whitney Avenue, drive one-half block, and turn left on Canner Street. Follow Canner Street to Prospect street (a distance of two blocks) and turn left onto Prospect. The entrance to the Divinity School is approximately 1 block down Prospect on the left.

 

Interstate 91 (from north)

Take exit 6, Willow Street, a right-hand exit, and follow the directions above.

 

By Train

Take Amtrak or Metro-North to New Haven. From the New Haven train station take a taxi to 409 Prospect Street.